An embarrassment of riches

We are delighted to say that we have already a full and varied programme for our upcoming conference ‘Translations in Times of Disruption’ (St. Peter’s College, Oxford, 10 May 2014) that will include speakers from three continents covering an extremely wide range of topics, periods and languages which fortunately fall naturally into coherent panels. This means, sadly, that we are unable to accept any more offers for papers.

We shall be posting further details of this conference very soon in this site and look forward to welcoming participants to what promises to be a very exciting event.

For more information contact any of the coordinators: Dr. Graciela Iglesias Rogers (graciela.iglesiasrogers@history.ox.ac.uk) and/or Professor David Hook (david.hook@mod-langs.ox.ac.uk) and/or Dr. Jonathan Thacker (jonathan.thacker@merton.ox.ac.uk ).

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Reminder – CFP deadline

Roots of restlessness? Translations in times of Disruption

Supported by The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities (TORCH) and the Modern European History Research Centre (MEHRC)

The deadline for submitting an abstract is 31 January 2014.

Please send proposals to translations.transnational@gmail.com .

You should receive an immediate acknowledgment – if not, please send again or contact the coordinators.

Conference date: Saturday 10th May 2014

Venue: St. Peter’s College, University of Oxford.

The University of Oxford’s interdisciplinary network Translations in Transnational Contexts  invites submissions for a one-day conference that will consider the relevance, role and impact of translations during periods of serious discontinuity and/or rupture such as wars, invasions, imperial crises, mass migration, natural disasters (including epidemics), and revolutions – be they political, social, cultural or technological. The works studied can be literary and non-literary texts, images as well as records of verbal and non-verbal communications that took place at any time in history.

We have already a strong line-up of international speakers, including Prof. Horst Dippel (University of Kassel, editor in chief of ‘Constitutions of the World from the late 18th Century to the Middle of the 19th Century’ ) and Dr. Igor Mednikov (director of the Iberian Studies Centre at the Russian State University for the Humanities), but the network welcomes proposals from scholars at all stages of their academic careers and particularly those that cross disciplinary boundaries in the Humanities and Social Sciences

Key questions and topics to address might include, but are not limited to:

. Have translations ever instigated a crisis, or shaped the way in which it developed? If so, how far should translators be held responsible for such an outcome?

. To what extent have moments of disruption fostered or hindered the translation of specific works?

. Do periods of upheaval encourage the production of new translations and/or the reprint of old works?  If the latter, were long-established artistic or literary works preferred to non-literary works, or the reverse?

. What impact, if any, abruptly-changing circumstances have on matters of accuracy, fidelity and/or writing style?

Submissions are not restricted to any specific period, area of study or language.  The conference will be organized in sessions containing panels and/or individual papers for which separate Call For Papers can be made.  Innovative formats of research communication (including 10-minute presentations) are welcome along with traditional 20-minute papers.

Please send your 250 word proposal including name, affiliation, and contact details to the following email address: translations.transnational@gmail.com

For more information contact the coordinators: Dr. Graciela Iglesias Rogers (graciela.iglesiasrogers@history.ox.ac.uk) and/or Professor David Hook (david.hook@mod-langs.ox.ac.uk) and/or Dr. Jonathan Thacker (jonathan.thacker@merton.ox.ac.uk ).

Sponsorship

Modern European History Research Centre (MEHRC)

We are delighted to announce that the Modern European History Research Centre (MEHRC), based in Oxford University’s History Faculty, has decided to join the list of sponsors of our upcoming conference “Roots of restlessness? Translations in Times of Disruption”  (St. Peter’s College, 10 May 2014). The Call for Papers for both the conference and its opening session will close on 31st January (CFP for conference and CFP for session).

The MEHRC was set up in 1999 to generate new and exciting research projects in European and British history from the Renaissance to the present, to build research networks with institutes and universities in the UK, Europe and worldwide, to provide opportunities for research collaboration and facilities for visiting researchers, and to train new generations of research students in the field of Modern European and British History.

The Centre encourages international collaboration between research students through annual graduate workshops held in conjunction with the Ecole Normale Supérieure de Cachan, Paris, the Université Libre de Bruxelles, the Humboldt University, Berlin, and with  Geneva University. It is supported by around forty leading historians at Oxford, from which it draws its management committee. This is headed by the Chair, Dr David Hopkin; Research Director, Dr Tom Buchanan and supported by the Administrator, Jane Cunning.

For more information on the MEHRC, visit their website:  http://www.history.ox.ac.uk/research/centre/mehrc.html

CFP for session:

Translating a Liberal Codex – the Cádiz Constitution of 1812

(As part of the conference ‘Roots of restlessness? Translations in Times of Disruption’ organized by the Oxford Research Network Translations in Transnational contexts, 10 May 2014, at St. Peter’s College, supported by The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities – TORCH) and the Modern European History Research Centre (MEHRC)

The deadline for submitting an abstract is 31 January 2014.

The Political Constitution of the Spanish Monarchy, commonly known as the Constitution of Cádiz, was once famously described by the historian Raymond Carr as the ‘Liberal Codex’ of the nineteenth century.  It was drafted by representatives from Iberian Spain, Spanish America and the Philippines gathered in Cádiz (hence, its common name) during much of the Napoleonic wars.  It was promulgated there on 19 March 1812. This text is believed to have served as inspiration to other liberal constitutions around the world. As a Western symbol of political freedoms and rights, it was studied – through its various translations – by Thomas Jefferson, Jeremy Bentham, and Karl Marx, among others. The political content of the Constitution has been analysed from numerous perspectives. Our research focuses rather on the outcomes arising from the process of its transfer and translation to other political cultures.

This session will be opened by Prof. Horst Dippel (University of Kassel), editor in chief of the renowned series ‘Constitutions of the World from the late 18th Century to the Middle of the 19th Century’ and ‘Constitutions of the World 1850 to the Present’. He will be addressing the challenges of translating constitutions in general to then focus on German versions of the Cádiz text. This will be followed by contributions by Prof. David Hook (Modern Languages, Oxford) and Dr. Graciela Iglesias Rogers (History, Oxford) on Italian and English (British) translations respectively.

We are, therefore, particularly interested in proposals that will cover other European and non-European languages, including those on which it is known that versions were produced [e.g English (American), French and Russian] and others on which there have been mere references, yet it is possible that versions may exist, such as in Danish, Dutch and/or Flemish, Gaelic, the indigenous languages of Mexico and the Philippines, Arab, Bengali, Mandarin, etc. We are also interested in translations into visual and oral media.

The network welcomes proposals from scholars at all stages of their academic careers and particularly those that cross disciplinary boundaries in the Humanities and Social Sciences. Innovative formats of research communication (including 10-minute presentations) are welcome along with traditional 20-minute papers.

Please send your 250 word proposal including name, affiliation, and contact details to the following email address: translations.transnational@gmail.com

For more information contact any of the coordinators: Dr. Graciela Iglesias Rogers (graciela.iglesiasrogers@history.ox.ac.uk) and/or Professor David Hook (david.hook@mod-langs.ox.ac.uk) and/or Dr. Jonathan Thacker (jonathan.thacker@merton.ox.ac.uk ).

Fundraising for Philippines at Oxford

We forward this message on behalf of Dr Danica Salazar, a member of our Network who is co-ordinating the local Philippines Society response to the recent hurricane disaster:

Dear colleagues,
Typhoon Haiyan, one of the strongest storms ever recorded to hit land, caused severe devastation in the Philippines. Thousands are now feared dead, hundreds of thousands have lost their homes, and millions have been affected in the aftermath of the storm. This typhoon caused a humanitarian crisis of an immense scale, and with so many in desperate need of help, all of us have to take immediate action.
We at the Oxford Philippines Society are taking part in the global effort to aid those affected by raising funds for the Disasters Emergency Committee’s Philippines Typhoon Appeal. We will be holding a formal dinner at Oriel College on Saturday, 23 November at 7:30 pm, preceded by drinks in the Champneys Room at 7:00 pm. The dinner costs £30, and proceeds will go to the DEC Appeal. If you would like to join us for dinner, please email danica.salazar@ell.ox.ac.uk. We will then send you instructions on how to make the payment.
If you cannot attend the dinner, or wish to give more than £30, you can make a donation through the OPS Just Giving page: http://www.justgiving.com/oxfordphilippinestyphoon. Donations made through the site will go directly to the DEC Appeal.
We will also be accepting cash or cheque donations during the dinner, should you prefer these methods.
We thank you in advance for your kind generosity. We would also appreciate your help in spreading the word about this event, as we would like as many people as possible to join us in our fundraising efforts here in Oxford.
With best wishes,
Danica
(on behalf of the Oxford Philippines Society)

Conference: Translating European Languages

For those interested in translation theory and/or translation studies, colleagues of the Modern Languages Department and the European Research Centre here at Oxford have organized the following conference:  

Translating European Languages: History, Ideology and Censorship

Friday 1st  andSaturday 2nd  November 2013

Venue:  TORCH, The Radcliffe Humanities Building – Woodstock Road, Graduate Training Room

To attend it is necessary first to register. For more information, visit their website: http://www.ehrc.ox.ac.uk/node/69

Conference at Edinburgh

Translating Cultures in the Hispanic World

Colleagues at the University of Edinburgh are organizing this conference

  7-8 November 2013

Location: Teviot Dining Room, Teviot Row, 13 Bristol Square, University of Edinburgh Edinburgh EH8 9AJ

The Hispanic world represents an exceptionally rich and fertile context in which to reflect on the role of translation not only as a vehicle for cultural exchange, the transmission of bodies of knowledge and memory, but also as a means of either asserting or resisting power in order to create something new. Drawing on translation theory, the conference seeks to encourage new ways of thinking about influence, reception, and mis-appropriation. Issues to be addressed include: domestication versus foreignization; transgressive modes of translation; translation between different media and contexts; translation-knowledge-power; translation as colonization.

The conference is transhistorical, shifting focus from medieval Spain to the wider Hispanic world in the early modern and modern period. Topics to be covered include:
– objects of cross-cultural communication in medieval Spain
– shifts and adaptations in Iberian iconographies
– transfer and transformations of Iberian models of art in Latin America
– cultural representations of social ‘others’
– 19th-century photography, the image as transmitter of another presence
– historiography; the reception of Hispanic art.

Conference fees:
£30 (£15 concessions)
The conference is free for University of Edinburgh students (who will still need to register)

For more information  contact  Claudia Hopkins, Email: c.hopkins@ed.ac.uk or visit their website at http://www.artintranslation.org

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